Occupational therapy

Occupational therapy uses purposeful activities to restore and maximize independence, prevent associated disability, and maintain health. Specific activities are used to improve or restore function, such as bathing, grooming, and toileting; to compensate for dysfunction; or to minimize disability.

Occupational therapy provides experience and practice with actual tasks to enable patients to participate to the fullest of their abilities in their daily living environments. People with the following health issues may benefit from occupational therapy:
• Adults who have experienced work-related injuries, including to the lower back or from repetitive stress.
• Adults facing limitations after a heart attack or stroke.
• Adults with arthritis, multiple sclerosis, or other serious chronic conditions.
• Children with birth injuries, learning problems, or developmental disabilities.
• Children and adults with mental or behavioral health problems, including schizophrenia, post-traumatic stress disorder, or substance abuse or eating disorders.
• Adults with Alzheimer's disease.
• Children and adults with burns, spinal cord injuries, or amputations.
• Children and adults with broken bones or other injuries from falls, sports injuries, or accidents.
• Adults with vision or cognitive problems that threaten the ability to drive.